1. (Source: versaversa)

  2. allthingseurope:

Tallinn, Estonia (by Konstantin Yolshin)

    allthingseurope:

    Tallinn, Estonia (by Konstantin Yolshin)

  3. lensblr-network:

Le Mont Saint-Michel, Normandy, France
by Mary Campbell  (maryandhercamera.tumblr.com)

    lensblr-network:

    Le Mont Saint-Michel, Normandy, France

  4. meet-me-in-europe:

Santorini, Greece

    meet-me-in-europe:

    Santorini, Greece

  5. dewymossempire:

Bibury, England.
Source.

    dewymossempire:

    Bibury, England.

    Source.

  6. (Source: swagpizza)

  7. (Source: kendrasmiles4u)

  8. versaillesadness:

Peterhof, St Petersburg, Russia.

    versaillesadness:

    Peterhof, St Petersburg, Russia.

  9. (Source: destroyed-and-abandoned)

  10. allthingseurope:

Colmar, France (by Zaffiro&Acciaio: Marco Ferrari)

    allthingseurope:

    Colmar, France (by Zaffiro&Acciaio: Marco Ferrari)

  11. architizer:

Renzo Piano’s done it again at Harvard. Read more.

    architizer:

    Renzo Piano’s done it again at Harvard. Read more.

  12. stonearchabridged:

Life in the 612. Welcome to my city. stuffaboutminneapolis

    stonearchabridged:

    Life in the 612. Welcome to my city. stuffaboutminneapolis

  13. (Source: roomonfiredesign)

  14. ytellioglu:

    Karanlık Kilise (or the Dark Church) was a monastic compound built in the 11th century. It is a domed church with one main apse, two small apses and four columns. It was decorated with scenes from the New Testament:  Christ Pantocrator, Nativity, Adoration of the Magi, First Bath, Last Supper, Betrayal of Judas, Crucifixion, Anastasis.After the Turkish invasion it was used as a pigeon house until 1950s. After 14 years of scraping pigeon droppings off the walls, these newly restored frescoes, depicting scenes from the New Testament, are the best preserved in all of Cappadocia and a fine example of 11th-century Byzantine art. Part of the narthex or vestibule however collapsed opening part of the church’s roof to the sky. This caused damage to the fresco with Christ’s Ascension and the Benediction of the Saints, whereas the other scenes only partially remain where the wall collapsed. The church’s name possibly comes from a small oculus looking out of the narthex which only lets in a very small amount of light. This feature is what has preserved the richness of the pigments and allowed them to survive the passage of time.